The Heart Of Worship

The Heart Of Worship

The title of the song above is known throughout the world. The song dates back to the late 1990s and has a remarkable story. It teaches us some great principles on how to have a heart of worship. 

So let me say no more than to hand over to the writer Matt Redman and let him explain.

“The song dates back to the late 1990s, born from a period of apathy within Matt’s home church, Soul Survivor, in Watford, England. Despite the country’s overall contribution to the current worship revival, Redman’s congregation was struggling to find meaning in its musical outpouring at the time.”

“There was a dynamic missing, so the pastor did a pretty brave thing,” he recalls. “He decided to get rid of the sound system and band for a season, and we gathered together with just our voices. His point was that we’d lost our way in worship, and the way to get back to the heart would be to strip everything away.”

Reminding his church family to be producers in worship, not just consumers, the pastor, Mike Pilavachi, asked, “When you come through the doors on a Sunday, what are you bringing as your offering to God?”

Matt says the question initially led to some embarrassing silence, but eventually, people broke into acapella songs and heartfelt prayers, encountering God in a fresh way.

“Before long, we reintroduced the musicians and sound system, as we’d gained a new perspective that worship is all about Jesus, and He commands a response in the depths of our souls no matter what the circumstance and setting. ‘The Heart of Worship’ simply describes what occurred.”

When the music fades, all is stripped away, and I simply come / Longing just to bring something that’s of worth that will bless your heart… / I’m coming back to the heart of worship, and it’s all about You, Jesus

Redman remembers writing the song quickly in his bedroom soon after the church’s journey together, with no grand intentions, by any means, for it to become an international anthem. He viewed the words simply as his personal, subjective response to what he was learning about worship.

But when Matt shared “The Heart of Worship” with Pilavachi, the pastor suggested making a few small adjustments to the lyrics so any member of the church could relate to it as well.

Amazed by how God has since taken the song around the world for His purposes, the songwriter smiles in regard to his own lack of foresight. “It nearly didn’t go any further than my bedroom. But I love that…”

The trademark tune soon became the title track for Matt Redman’s 1999 album, The Heart of Worship. The recording process was consistent with the artist’s sensitive approach to being in the studio.

“We decided to not get all complicated, and just let the song ‘breathe.’ We’re always trying to create more of a church atmosphere in the studio rather than just a technical musical gathering. Something happens when the people of God gather together and play out the praises of God in the presence of God. Hopefully, something of that passion and purpose transcends beyond that studio room onto the recordings themselves.”

https://www.crosswalk.com/church/worship/song-story-matt-redmans-the-heart-of-worship-1253122.html

Speaking to one another with psalms, hymns, and songs from the Spirit. Sing and make music from your heart to the Lord.

Ephesians. 5:19

When Paul uses the word speak, Paul is talking about the lyrics of our songs, not the musical style we add to them. 

Why do we always think that worship is about us and our personal likes and dislikes? 

We are to speak and sing words that edify the whole body, not just ourselves or a select few. 

How do I create a heart to love God and worship Him?

How can I love God passionately? 

Jesus gives us some help on how to love God. It is found in His reply to the question of someone asking Him to give him the greatest commandments in Scripture. 

Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength. (Mark 12:30 NIV) 

Note 

Heart could often be translated “mind”. Since the Hebrews had no separate word for “mind,” the word “heart” often served to represent the seat of the intellect. The key to the whole man is his mind. Whatever captures the mind captures the man. 

So let me leave you with this thought. On Sunday no matter if you are on Zoom, YouTube, Facebook etc or back at church, what is in our mind?

Why not play this song on Sunday morning before you enter your service.

Reminding his church family to be producers in worship, not just consumers, the pastor, Mike Pilavachi, asked, “When you come through the doors on a Sunday, what are you bringing as your offering to God?”

Stay safe. Blessed